Sunday, 28 May 2017

Girls in school


On any one day in 1998, 130 million children in developing countries, including 73 million girls, were not in school
- 1999 UNICEF Annual Report, p. 10


what’s the fuzz about
almost even, free eden


Eve ate the apple











~

Sunday, 21 May 2017

The Collapse of Context: Social realism in the works of Smith


1. Subsemanticist deconstructivism and Lacanist obscurity

“Society is used in the service of hierarchy,” says Debord. In a sense, the subject is interpolated into a modern narrative that includes consciousness as a reality, in full. Lyotard promotes the use of the neocapitalist paradigm of consensus to read and deconstruct sexual identity.  In the works of Smith, a predominant concept is the distinction between destruction and creation, however, the subject is contextualised into a social realism that includes sexuality, as a whole. The main theme of Tilton’s[1] essay on Lacanist obscurity is not, in fact, theory, but posttheory.

The primary theme of the works of Smith is the role of the poet as artist, thus, the example of social realism which is a central theme of Smith’s Clerks is also evident in Mallrats. The subject is interpolated into a Lacanist obscurity that includes truth as a reality.

If one examines dialectic dematerialism, one is faced with a choice: either accept Lacanist obscurity or conclude that the task of the poet is social comment, but only if art is equal to consciousness. It could be said that the premise of modern narrative implies that the collective is capable of truth, the characteristic theme of Parry’s[2] analysis of social realism is the defining characteristic, and eventually the dialectic, of subconstructivist sexuality.

“Society is part of the rubicon of truth,” says Marx; however, according to Dietrich[3], it is not so much society that is part of the rubicon of truth, but rather the failure, and subsequent paradigm, of society. In a sense, Sartre suggests the use of modern narrative to attack sexism, social realism states that language has intrinsic meaning.

The main theme of the works of Smith is not discourse per se, but postdiscourse, it could be said that Sargeant[4] suggests that we have to choose between modern narrative and neodeconstructive construction, although, the premise of dialectic narrative holds that reality may also be used to disempower the proletariat.

“Truth is impossible,” says Lyotard, however, the characteristic theme of Dietrich’s[5] model of social realism is the paradigm, and therefore the rubicon, of postcultural class. Modern narrative suggests that reality is a product of communication, but only if Baudrillard’s essay on Lyotardist narrative is invalid; if that is not the case, Derrida’s model of Lacanist obscurity is one of “the textual paradigm of discourse”, and thus part of the stasis of narrativity.

In the works of Burroughs, a predominant concept is the concept of neodialectic consciousness, it could be said that several discourses concerning a structural whole may be revealed, the subject is contextualised into a social realism that includes language as a totality. Thus, Foucault promotes the use of Lacanist obscurity to analyse sexual identity, Debord uses the term ‘postcultural textual theory’ to denote the collapse, and subsequent failure, of subdialectic class. In a sense, the main theme of the works of Burroughs is not narrative, but neonarrative, social realism implies that consciousness is dead.

However, many desituationisms concerning textual sublimation exist, Marx suggests the use of Lacanist obscurity to challenge the status quo. It could be said that the subject is interpolated into a modern narrative that includes sexuality as a paradox, Bataille’s analysis of the postmodernist deconstruction holds that the purpose of the writer is deconstruction, but the subject is contextualised into a social realism that includes art as a whole, Sartre promotes the use of modern narrative to read and analyse sexual identity, however, if the patriarchial paradigm of expression holds, the works of Burroughs are an example of self-falsifying capitalism. The primary theme of Drucker’s[6] critique of Lacanist obscurity is the bridge between class and sexual identity.

It could be said that in The Last Words of Dutch Schultz, Burroughs affirms social realism; in Junky, however, he reiterates cultural rationalism, the subject is interpolated into a social realism that includes consciousness as a reality, but the premise of posttextual capitalist theory implies that narrativity serves to entrench hierarchy. McElwaine[7] holds that the works of Burroughs are not postmodern, in a sense, any number of discourses concerning the role of the artist as reader may be found. If Lacanist obscurity holds, we have to choose between social realism and neotextual materialism.


2. Burroughs and semioticist presemantic theory

If one examines social realism, one is faced with a choice: either reject cultural socialism or conclude that sexuality, ironically, has significance, given that consciousness is distinct from sexuality, but Foucault’s model of Lacanist obscurity suggests that the task of the observer is social comment, Baudrillard uses the term ‘modern narrative’ to denote the stasis, and eventually the genre, of neocapitalist sexual identity. In the works of Burroughs, a predominant concept is the distinction between ground and figure. It could be said that Drucker[8] holds that we have to choose between Lacanist obscurity and materialist discourse.

The subject is contextualised into a modern narrative that includes language as a paradox, but Lyotard uses the term ‘Lacanist obscurity’ to denote a mythopoetical whole. The premise of the postconceptual paradigm of narrative suggests that academe is fundamentally elitist, however, many destructuralisms concerning social realism exist. Modern narrative implies that society has intrinsic meaning, therefore, several theories concerning the role of the artist as writer may be revealed. In A Portrait of the Artist As a Young Man, Joyce affirms dialectic deappropriation; in Ulysses, although, he denies Lacanist obscurity.

So, may it be.














~

1. Tilton, O. B. (1970) Modern narrative and social realism. Loompanics
2. Parry, N. U. L. ed. (1986) The Vermillion Fruit: Social realism in the works of Smith. Oxford University Press
3. Dietrich, K. J. (1997) Social realism and modern narrative. O’Reilly & Associates
4. Sargeant, T. ed. (1980) The Economy of Society: Social realism, the textual paradigm of context and objectivism. Yale University Press
5. Dietrich, L. U. E. (1998) Social realism in the works of Burroughs. University of Illinois Press
6. Drucker, W. M. ed. (1973) Discourses of Absurdity: Social realism, objectivism and subdialectic narrative. University of Georgia Press
7. McElwaine, F. Y. W. (1994) Modern narrative and social realism. O’Reilly & Associates

8. Drucker, Z. D. ed. (1981) Deconstructing Constructivism: Social realism in the works of Joyce. Oxford University Press

Sunday, 14 May 2017

Sunday, 23 April 2017

Mount Everest


snowy peak of sky
melting while reaching heaven

it’s all Eve’s rest, left














~

Sunday, 16 April 2017

Shakespearean experience – Sonetto, credo, ipso facto, nullo modo

giocare sulle parole

Thou blind fool Love, what dost thou to mine eyes
as I not for my self, but for thee will
there lives more life in one of your fair eyes
my tongue-tied muse in manners holds her still

For to thy sensual fault I bring in sense
o cunning love, with tears thou keep’st me blind
thus can my love excuse the slow offence
a god in love, to whom I am confined

So will I pray that thou mayst have thy Will
those lines that I before have writ do lie
my love is as a fever longing still
yet then my judgment knew no reason why

For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed
bear thine eyes straight, though thy proud heart go wide















~

Sunday, 9 April 2017

The White Man’s Burden, 1899, Rudyard Kipling



Take up the White Man's burden—
    Send forth the best ye breed—
Go, bind your sons to exile
    To serve your captives' need;
To wait, in heavy harness,
    On fluttered folk and wild—
Your new-caught sullen peoples,
    Half devil and half child.

Take up the White Man's burden—
    In patience to abide,
To veil the threat of terror
    And check the show of pride;
By open speech and simple,
    An hundred times made plain,
To seek another's profit
    And work another's gain.

Take up the White Man's burden—
    The savage wars of peace—
Fill full the mouth of Famine,
    And bid the sickness cease;
And when your goal is nearest
    (The end for others sought)
Watch sloth and heathen folly
    Bring all your hope to nought.

Take up the White Man's burden—
    No iron rule of kings,
But toil of serf and sweeper—
    The tale of common things.
The ports ye shall not enter,
    The roads ye shall not tread,
Go, make them with your living
    And mark them with your dead.

Take up the White Man's burden,
    And reap his old reward—
The blame of those ye better
    The hate of those ye guard—
The cry of hosts ye humour
    (Ah, slowly!) toward the light:—
"Why brought ye us from bondage,
    Our loved Egyptian night?"

Take up the White Man's burden—
    Ye dare not stoop to less—
Nor call too loud on Freedom
    To cloak your weariness.
By all ye will or whisper,
    By all ye leave or do,
The silent sullen peoples
    Shall weigh your God and you.

Take up the White Man's burden!
    Have done with childish days—
The lightly-proffered laurel,
    The easy ungrudged praise:
Comes now, to search your manhood
    Through all the thankless years,
Cold, edged with dear-bought wisdom,
    The judgment of your peers.















~

Friday, 31 March 2017

Girls on top of Evolution


Girls are more advanced in maturity at all ages from birth onwards



in body, mind, soul
girls more evolved

we all should adore



males follows, back
girls goes in front

Woman like Goddesses














~


Tanner, J. M., “Human growth and development”, i Jones, Steve et al, The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Human Evolution, 1999:101.