Monday, 14 August 2017

Heid apart


apartheid goes
nationalism unites


heid apart, SA













~

Monday, 7 August 2017

SS-Gaza-Totenkopfverbände


no gaz for Gaza
Liberty from Israël


SS Free Gaza














~

Monday, 31 July 2017

Time – Person of the Year



1938 Adolf Hitler




1939 Josef Stalin





1942 Josef Stalin





1979 ayatolla Khomeini





2000 George W. Bush




2004 George W. Bush




2007 Vladimir Putin























~

Saturday, 15 July 2017

The worship of Woman



Woman are the Goddesses of the earthly world, she should blossom to her full potential, in every aspect of her will, we all should be gratefull for the breath we can take, which all is of a womans work.












~

Saturday, 8 July 2017

Your tears


the tears of happiness from You
bring life into earth

the tears of joy from You
I taste, any time














Sunday, 28 May 2017

Girls in school


On any one day in 1998, 130 million children in developing countries, including 73 million girls, were not in school
- 1999 UNICEF Annual Report, p. 10


what’s the fuzz about
almost even, free eden


Eve ate the apple











~

Sunday, 21 May 2017

The Collapse of Context: Social realism in the works of Smith


1. Subsemanticist deconstructivism and Lacanist obscurity

“Society is used in the service of hierarchy,” says Debord. In a sense, the subject is interpolated into a modern narrative that includes consciousness as a reality, in full. Lyotard promotes the use of the neocapitalist paradigm of consensus to read and deconstruct sexual identity.  In the works of Smith, a predominant concept is the distinction between destruction and creation, however, the subject is contextualised into a social realism that includes sexuality, as a whole. The main theme of Tilton’s[1] essay on Lacanist obscurity is not, in fact, theory, but posttheory.

The primary theme of the works of Smith is the role of the poet as artist, thus, the example of social realism which is a central theme of Smith’s Clerks is also evident in Mallrats. The subject is interpolated into a Lacanist obscurity that includes truth as a reality.

If one examines dialectic dematerialism, one is faced with a choice: either accept Lacanist obscurity or conclude that the task of the poet is social comment, but only if art is equal to consciousness. It could be said that the premise of modern narrative implies that the collective is capable of truth, the characteristic theme of Parry’s[2] analysis of social realism is the defining characteristic, and eventually the dialectic, of subconstructivist sexuality.

“Society is part of the rubicon of truth,” says Marx; however, according to Dietrich[3], it is not so much society that is part of the rubicon of truth, but rather the failure, and subsequent paradigm, of society. In a sense, Sartre suggests the use of modern narrative to attack sexism, social realism states that language has intrinsic meaning.

The main theme of the works of Smith is not discourse per se, but postdiscourse, it could be said that Sargeant[4] suggests that we have to choose between modern narrative and neodeconstructive construction, although, the premise of dialectic narrative holds that reality may also be used to disempower the proletariat.

“Truth is impossible,” says Lyotard, however, the characteristic theme of Dietrich’s[5] model of social realism is the paradigm, and therefore the rubicon, of postcultural class. Modern narrative suggests that reality is a product of communication, but only if Baudrillard’s essay on Lyotardist narrative is invalid; if that is not the case, Derrida’s model of Lacanist obscurity is one of “the textual paradigm of discourse”, and thus part of the stasis of narrativity.

In the works of Burroughs, a predominant concept is the concept of neodialectic consciousness, it could be said that several discourses concerning a structural whole may be revealed, the subject is contextualised into a social realism that includes language as a totality. Thus, Foucault promotes the use of Lacanist obscurity to analyse sexual identity, Debord uses the term ‘postcultural textual theory’ to denote the collapse, and subsequent failure, of subdialectic class. In a sense, the main theme of the works of Burroughs is not narrative, but neonarrative, social realism implies that consciousness is dead.

However, many desituationisms concerning textual sublimation exist, Marx suggests the use of Lacanist obscurity to challenge the status quo. It could be said that the subject is interpolated into a modern narrative that includes sexuality as a paradox, Bataille’s analysis of the postmodernist deconstruction holds that the purpose of the writer is deconstruction, but the subject is contextualised into a social realism that includes art as a whole, Sartre promotes the use of modern narrative to read and analyse sexual identity, however, if the patriarchial paradigm of expression holds, the works of Burroughs are an example of self-falsifying capitalism. The primary theme of Drucker’s[6] critique of Lacanist obscurity is the bridge between class and sexual identity.

It could be said that in The Last Words of Dutch Schultz, Burroughs affirms social realism; in Junky, however, he reiterates cultural rationalism, the subject is interpolated into a social realism that includes consciousness as a reality, but the premise of posttextual capitalist theory implies that narrativity serves to entrench hierarchy. McElwaine[7] holds that the works of Burroughs are not postmodern, in a sense, any number of discourses concerning the role of the artist as reader may be found. If Lacanist obscurity holds, we have to choose between social realism and neotextual materialism.


2. Burroughs and semioticist presemantic theory

If one examines social realism, one is faced with a choice: either reject cultural socialism or conclude that sexuality, ironically, has significance, given that consciousness is distinct from sexuality, but Foucault’s model of Lacanist obscurity suggests that the task of the observer is social comment, Baudrillard uses the term ‘modern narrative’ to denote the stasis, and eventually the genre, of neocapitalist sexual identity. In the works of Burroughs, a predominant concept is the distinction between ground and figure. It could be said that Drucker[8] holds that we have to choose between Lacanist obscurity and materialist discourse.

The subject is contextualised into a modern narrative that includes language as a paradox, but Lyotard uses the term ‘Lacanist obscurity’ to denote a mythopoetical whole. The premise of the postconceptual paradigm of narrative suggests that academe is fundamentally elitist, however, many destructuralisms concerning social realism exist. Modern narrative implies that society has intrinsic meaning, therefore, several theories concerning the role of the artist as writer may be revealed. In A Portrait of the Artist As a Young Man, Joyce affirms dialectic deappropriation; in Ulysses, although, he denies Lacanist obscurity.

So, may it be.














~

1. Tilton, O. B. (1970) Modern narrative and social realism. Loompanics
2. Parry, N. U. L. ed. (1986) The Vermillion Fruit: Social realism in the works of Smith. Oxford University Press
3. Dietrich, K. J. (1997) Social realism and modern narrative. O’Reilly & Associates
4. Sargeant, T. ed. (1980) The Economy of Society: Social realism, the textual paradigm of context and objectivism. Yale University Press
5. Dietrich, L. U. E. (1998) Social realism in the works of Burroughs. University of Illinois Press
6. Drucker, W. M. ed. (1973) Discourses of Absurdity: Social realism, objectivism and subdialectic narrative. University of Georgia Press
7. McElwaine, F. Y. W. (1994) Modern narrative and social realism. O’Reilly & Associates

8. Drucker, Z. D. ed. (1981) Deconstructing Constructivism: Social realism in the works of Joyce. Oxford University Press

Sunday, 14 May 2017